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All things under Saturn conduce to sadness, and melancholy. Saturn governs old men, monkeys, melancholy men, and hid treasures; and those things which are obtained with long journeys, and difficulty.[1] That which is Saturnine is used to procure misery or sickness.[2]

Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa describes Saturne as a melancholy man[3] who is of black and yellowish colour. He is lean, crooked, of a rough skin, with great veins, and hairy all over his body. He has a thin beard with great lips. His frowning forehead bear little eyes that are intent upon the ground, with a heavy gait. His feet strike together as he walks, crafty, witty, a seducer, and murderous.[3] Saturne is cold and dry, as is his melancholy humor. He is the Author of secret contemplation, and estranged from all public affairs. He is the highest of all the planets, and by calling his mind from outward businesses, he ascends higher, which bestows upon him the knowledge, and passages of future things.[4] Saturn's friends are Mercury, Jupiter, Sun, and Moon, whilst his enemies are Mars and Venus.[5]

The correspondences of Saturn are described below.

AnimalsEdit

  • Birds that resemble Saturn are, all of them, called terrible, and deadly. Such as the Screech Owl, the Hawlet, and the horn Owl because she is a Saturnall solitary bird, also nightly.[6]

BodyEdit

  • Of the seven holes in the head of an Animal, distributed to the seven Planets, the right ear is attributed to Saturne.[1]
  • Saturn rules over the liver and fleshy part of the stomach.[1]

ColorsEdit

  • Black, lucid, earthy, leaden, and brown.[7]

Contrary propertiesEdit

Among flying things, the Saturnine bird known as Quaile, is a great enemy to the Moon and Sun.[8]

ElementsEdit

  • Agrippa attributes the element of water (Celestial communication) to Saturn.[9]

PlacesEdit

  • All stinking places, dark, underground, religious, and mournful places, such as Church-yards, and tombs. Houses not inhabited by men, old, tottering, obscure, and dreadful houses. Solitary dens, caves, pits, fish-ponds, standing pools, and fennes.[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 22
  2. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 50
  3. 3.0 3.1 Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 52
  4. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 60
  5. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 17
  6. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 55
  7. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 49
  8. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 24
  9. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 8
  10. Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa. Of Occult Philosophy, Book I. Chapter 48

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